Start Teen cyber dating stats

Teen cyber dating stats

“Personally, I would never be in an online relationship because I’d be afraid they are catfishing me, and with those types of things, you can never really be sure.” A GOOD CATCH?

Amy Giberson, now 34, was reluctant to try internet dating again but she decided to give it one more shot in 2014. There are a slew of sites and apps to help singles find love and, for the most part, they work, according to Consumer Reports.

She downloaded the Match app and connected with Justin Pounders, also 34, almost immediately. Nearly half, or 44 percent, of those who tried online dating said it led to a serious long-term relationship or marriage, the magazine found.

“We basically would play the question game and see if we have things in common,” she said. Jennie Noll, the director of research for behavioral medicine and clinical psychology at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, conducted the first objective study of Internet behavior in teenagers.

The study, which appears in the February issue of the journal Pediatics, found that 30 percent of teenage girls met up with a stranger in person after initially meeting them online.

"Unlike shopping for a bank or a refrigerator, in the case of online dating, the refrigerator has to like you back," Gilman said.

"There is a different level of exposure to disappointment and that's captured in the poor overall scores." Once considered taboo, online dating is now a socially accepted and booming multibillion dollar business that continues to grow.

SOURCE: Consumer Reports "It's clear that online dating websites play a major role in the lives of many consumers — we invest a tremendous amount of time, money and emotional energy.

It really is a consumer issue worthy of our attention." said Margot Gilman, money editor for Consumer Reports.

(A score of 100 indicates respondents were completely satisfied; 80 was very satisfied and 60 was fairly well-satisfied.) Still, many users found the sites frustrating.

In fact, when compared to other consumer products, like cars, computers and credit cards, online dating services received the lowest satisfaction scores Consumer Reports had ever seen, Gilman said.

More specifically, a catfish is someone who creates a fake online identity to meet others through social networks such as Facebook or Twitter. start using dating sites like Meetme, Skout and Tagged to socialize with new people.